A Dark And Smoky beer…

December 28th, 2010 by The Guru

Mysterious. Intense. Smooth. Three characteristics that I aspire to, in my personal life and in my beer. Well, in my beer, anyway. I fall in love with beers that exceed expectations, that take conventional and add another layer of complexity, a twist, an unexpected element.

One beer that is a bit hard to find these days, at least in my neck of the woods, is a true German Schwarzbier. There are dark lagers, but usually they are malty-sweet Munich Dunkels or just generic “dark lagers”… A Schwarzbier is the dark equivalent of a pilsner, crisp, hoppy, less full-bodied than the Munich style. Don’t get me wrong, I love the Munichs, both Hell and Dunkel, but sometimes the Schwarzbier is what I crave.

I also love the flavor of smoke in foods, and in beverages. I’ve been known to enjoy a peaty single malt Scotch from time to time – the peatier the better – and often brew with a little peat- or beechwood-smoked malt. I have made my own smoked malt a couple of times, using my own maple and apple wood. Smoked malts can be overwhelming, not for the faint of heart. Used in moderation, though, they add a nice touch, a nice twist, to a more conventional style.

As I was debating what to brew next, leaning towards a Schwarzbier, my son decided to brew a Rauchbier, shooting for a traditional heavily smoked amber lager. I talked him down from 50/50 smoked malt/Munich malt to a more moderate 20% rauchmalt and 80% pilsner and specialty grains. But of course that discussion led me to decide to add a little rauchmalt to my schwarzbier.

Dark brown to nearly black, with a strong but not overwhelming smoky flavor, this brew walks the fine line between a smooth stout and a Scotch ale. Since it’s fermented as a lager, it is very clean and crisp. The hops are mainly in the background, giving the beer a deep bitterness and not much hop aroma. At nearly 6% abv, this is a substantial brew.

Dark & Smoky Schwarz-Rauchbier

5 gallons, all grain

Ingredients:

  • 7 lbs. Weyermann Bohemian Pilsner malt
  • 2 lbs. Weyermann Rauchmalt
  • 1/2 lb. Weyermann Carafa I malt
  • 1/2 lb. roasted barley
  • 1 oz. Stirling hop pellets
  • 1 oz. Tettnanger hop pellets
  • White Labs German Lager yeast (WLP830)
  • 3/4 cup corn sugar (for priming)

Procedure:

Crush grains. Heat 13 quarts water to 162°F. Mash in and hold 90 minutes @ 150°F. Heat another 15 quarts water to 170°F. Begin runoff and sparge, collecting 25 quarts sweet wort. Bring to a boil, add Stirling hops and 1/2 oz. of the Tettnanger hops. Boil 40 minutes, add 1/4 oz. Tettnanger hops. Boil 18 minutes, add remaining 1/4 oz. Tettnanger hops, boil 2 minutes (60 total) and remove from heat. Chill to 80°F, take a hydrometer reading. Pitch yeast, seal and ferment at 55 – 60° for 7 to 10 days. Rack to secondary, condition at 40°F for three to four weeks. Prime with corn sugar, bottle and age cold (35 – 38°F) for six weeks.

OG: 1060

IBU’s: 39

Notes on ingredients:

Grains:There are both domestic and imported versions of beechwood smoked malt – the imported, from Bamberg, Germany is almost always labeled “rauchmalt”. The domestic version (available from Brewcraft) seems less intensely smoky to me.

I have been using Carafa malts instead of chocolate and black, recently. I find that the Carafa malts (which are dehusked before roasting) are much less tannic/bitter. They come in at least three different color ranges, this brew used the lightest of the three (“only” 300° or so Lovibond).

Hops: Stirling is a North American-grown cross between Saaz and Hallertauer, it has a woody and pineapple-like aroma, and at 7% aa is a nice choice for bittering German-style lagers.

Yeast: The German Lager strain is among the most neutral lager yeasts available; this beer is already complex enough without the addition of a strong, distinctive yeast profile.

PS: Just realized that my last post seems to have never uploaded correctly – two weeks ago I brewed a Bohemian-style Pilsner, and apparently failed to publish the story, etc. SO here is the recipe, at least!

Riley’s Czech Pils

5 gallons, all grain

Ingredients:

  • 7 lbs. Weyermann Bohemian Pilsner malt
  • 1 lb. cara-pils malt
  • 1 lb. Vienna malt
  • 3 oz. Saaz hop pellets
  • White Labs Budejovice Pilsner Lager yeast (WLP802)
  • 3/4 cup corn sugar (for priming)

Procedure:

Crush grains. Heat 13 quarts water to 167°F. Mash in grains, hold 60 minutes at 154°F. Heat another 15 quarts water to 170. Begin runoff and sparge, collecting 25 quarts sweet wort. Bring to boil, add 1-1/2 oz. Saaz hops. Boil 45 minutes, add 1/2 oz. Saaz. Boil another 15 minutes, add another 1/2 oz. Saaz. Boil 30 minutes (90 total), add last 1/2 oz. Saaz, remove from heat. Chill to 80°F, take a hydrometer reading. Pitch yeast, seal and ferment at 58 – 60°F for 8 to 10 days. Rack to secondary, condition at 40°F for four to six weeks. Prime with corn sugar, bottle and age cold (35°F) for six weeks.

OG: 1056

IBU’s: 41

With that, thank you for your support, your questions, your comments in 2010. It has been a fantastic year for me as the Home Brew Guru, and I look forward to 2011! Happy New Year!

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One lonely voice to “A Dark And Smoky beer…”

  1. Chris Says:

    Thanks for reposting the Czech pilsner recipe. I’m planning to do one in the next month or two and this has a few tweaks on my previous recipe. Can’t wait to try it.

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